Mount Everest: History and Facts to Know | Trekking Days
Select Page

Mount Everest: History and Facts to Know

by | Asia, Hotspots

When you buy through our external links, we may earn an affiliate commission at no additional cost to you. Learn more

Mount Everest, also known as Sagarmatha in Nepali and Chomolungma in Tibetan, is the highest mountain in the world, rising to an elevation of 29,029 feet (8,848 meters) above sea level. Located in the Himalayas on the border between Nepal and China, Mount Everest is an iconic symbol of adventure and has attracted climbers from all over the world since the early 20th century.

The mountain has a rich history and many interesting facts and stories associated with it, making it quite a fascinating subject for exploration. In this blog post, we’ll delve into the history of Mount Everest, its physical characteristics, the challenges and dangers of climbing the mountain, and the cultural and environmental impact it has had. Whether you’re a seasoned mountaineer or just a curious reader, there is probably something for you in the history and appeal of Mount Everest.

The discovery of Mount Everest

Early observations and measurements of the mountain

The discovery of Mount Everest dates back hundreds of years, as the mountain has long been revered by the local peoples of Nepal and Tibet. In Tibetan, the mountain is known as Chomolungma, which means “Mother of the Universe,” and it is considered a sacred site in Tibetan Buddhism. In Nepal, the mountain is known as Sagarmatha, which means “Head of the Sky,” and it is also considered a sacred site by the local people.

The first recorded observations of Mount Everest were made in the 18th century by British surveyors who were tasked with mapping the Himalayan mountain range. However, it wasn’t until the early 19th century that the mountain began to be studied in more detail. In 1802, the British surveyor Sir George Everest was assigned the task of mapping the Himalayan mountain range, which included the measurement and mapping of Mount Everest.

Despite the challenges posed by the rugged terrain and harsh climate, Sir George and his team were able to make a number of important observations about the mountain. They determined that Mount Everest was the highest peak in the Himalayan range, and they also recorded a number of other important features, including the mountain’s location, its geology, and its general shape and size.

It wasn’t until 1830, however, that the mountain was officially measured and its height determined. Using a variety of techniques, including trigonometric calculations and barometric readings, the surveyors were able to calculate the mountain’s height to be 29,002 feet (8,840 meters).

The naming of Mount Everest

At the time the mountain was first measured, it was known by the boring name “Peak XV,” as it was the 15th highest peak in the Himalayan mountain range to be measured by the surveyors. However, in 1865, the mountain was officially renamed “Mount Everest,” in honor of the British surveyor Sir George Everest, who had been responsible for mapping the mountain and the surrounding region.

The name “Mount Everest” was proposed by Andrew Waugh, the Surveyor General of India, who argued that it was appropriate to honor Sir George’s contributions to the study of the Himalayan mountain range by naming the highest peak after him. The name was officially approved by the Royal Geographical Society, and it has been in use ever since.

The first ascent of the mountain

The 1953 expedition to the summit of Mount Everest, led by Sir Edmund Hillary of New Zealand and Tenzing Norgay, a Sherpa of Nepal, was a historic achievement that marked the first successful climb of the highest mountain in the world. The expedition was organized by the British Mount Everest Expedition, and it was the ninth attempt to reach the summit of the mountain.

The expedition began in March 1953, and the climbers spent several weeks acclimatizing to the high altitude and preparing for the final push to the summit. On May 26, Hillary and Norgay set out from their final camp, located at an elevation of 8,000 m (26,247 ft) and began the final ascent to the summit. Despite facing extremely harsh conditions, including high winds and freezing temperatures, the two climbers were able to reach the summit on May 29, becoming the first people in history to do so.

The successful climb of Mount Everest by Hillary and Norgay was hailed as a major achievement, and the two climbers became international celebrities. The expedition also helped to bring attention to the skills and abilities of the Sherpa people, who played a crucial role in the success of the climb. Today, the 1953 expedition is remembered as a defining moment in the history of mountaineering, and the legacy of Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay lives on as an inspiration to climbers around the world.

Challenges and dangers that come with climbing Mount Everest

Those who attempt to reach the summit face a number of physical and logistical challenges. One of the main challenges is the high altitude, as the summit of Mount Everest stands at an elevation of 8,848 meters (29,029 feet) above sea level. This extreme altitude poses a number of risks, including altitude sickness, which can cause symptoms such as dizziness, nausea, and difficulty breathing. To mitigate these risks, climbers must spend several weeks acclimatizing to the high altitude before attempting the final ascent to the summit.

Mount Everest on a clear sky

In addition to the challenges posed by the high altitude, climbers must also contend with extreme weather conditions on the mountain. Temperatures at the summit can drop to as low as -60°C (-76°F) in the winter, and high winds and heavy snowfall are common throughout the year. These harsh conditions can make it difficult for climbers to keep warm and protected from the elements, and they can also create logistical challenges, such as difficulty in setting up camps and navigating the mountain.

Another major challenge faced by climbers is the risk of avalanches, which can be triggered by a variety of factors, including weather conditions and the movement of other climbers. Avalanches can cause serious injuries or even death, and they are a constant concern for those attempting to reach the summit of Mount Everest.

Mount Everest today

Modern-day climbing expeditions and the tourism industry

Since the first successful ascent of Mount Everest in 1953, the mountain has become a major tourist destination, and climbing expeditions to the summit have become increasingly popular. Today, hundreds of people attempt to reach the summit of Mount Everest each year, and the mountain has become a major industry in both Nepal and Tibet.

Climbing expeditions to Mount Everest are typically organized by professional guiding companies, which provide support and logistical assistance to climbers throughout the process. These expeditions can be expensive, as they require a significant investment in equipment, supplies, and support staff. However, for many climbers, the opportunity to stand on the highest point on Earth is a once-in-a-lifetime experience that is worth the cost.

In addition to the climbing expeditions, the mountain has also become a major tourist destination in its own right. Many people visit the region to take in the stunning views of the Himalayan mountain range and to learn more about the culture and history of the area. This has helped to boost the local economy and has led to the development of a range of tourism-related industries, including hotels, restaurants, and tour companies.

The cost of climbing Mount Everest can vary greatly depending on a number of factors, including the route you take, the type of climbing expedition you choose, and the amount of personal gear and supplies you need.

Here are some rough estimates for the cost of a Mount Everest climb:

  • Commercial expedition: $30,000-$120,000
  • Private expedition: $50,000-$300,000
  • Sherpa support: $5,000-$25,000

You can browse and book guided tours in the area here.

A less dangerous and much cheaper alternative is the Everest Base Camp trek. You can browse and book guided tours for this trek here.

Environmental concerns and efforts to protect the mountain

As the highest mountain in the world, Mount Everest holds a unique place in the natural world, and there are ongoing efforts to protect the mountain and its surrounding ecosystem. One of the main environmental concerns related to Mount Everest is the impact of climbing expeditions and tourism on the mountain. The hundreds of people who attempt to climb the mountain each year and the thousands of tourists who visit the region can have a significant impact on the environment, including the risk of pollution and damage to the delicate ecosystem.

To address these concerns, there have been a number of efforts to protect the mountain and its surroundings. These efforts have included measures to reduce pollution, such as the introduction of regulations that require climbers to bring down all of their trash and waste from the mountain. There have also been efforts to minimize the impact of tourism on the region, such as the development of sustainable tourism initiatives that seek to preserve the natural beauty of the area.

In addition to these efforts, there have also been a number of initiatives to increase research and understanding of the mountain and its ecosystem. These efforts have included scientific studies of the mountain’s geology, climate, and wildlife, as well as efforts to document the cultural and spiritual significance of the mountain to the local peoples of Nepal and Tibet.

Interesting facts about Mount Everest

Geology and location of the mountain

Geologically, Mount Everest is formed from layers of sedimentary and metamorphic rock that were uplifted and folded during the collision of the Indian and Eurasian tectonic plates. The mountain is primarily composed of sedimentary rocks, including sandstones, limestones, and shales, that were laid down millions of years ago and have been transformed by the forces of heat and pressure. These rocks are primarily sedimentary in origin, and they contain a variety of fossils that provide insight into the geologic history of the region.

In terms of its location, Mount Everest is situated in the heart of the Himalayan mountain range, which stretches for more than 1,500 miles (2,400 kilometers) across Nepal, Tibet, and northern India. The mountain is located near the highest point of the range, and it is surrounded by other peaks that rise to similar elevations. The region is characterized by rugged terrain, high elevations, and extreme weather conditions, making it a challenging and awe-inspiring place to explore.

Wildlife on Mount Everest

Despite its high elevation and extreme weather conditions, Mount Everest is home to a diverse range of flora and fauna. The mountain is located in the Himalayan mountain range, which is home to a wide variety of plant and animal species that are found nowhere else on Earth.

One of the most notable plant species found on Mount Everest is the Himalayan blue poppy, which is a rare and endangered species that is found at high elevations in the Himalayas. The mountain is also home to a number of other unique plant species, including rhododendrons, primulas, and junipers.

The pretty Himalayan blue poppy

In terms of animal life, Mount Everest is home to a number of species that have adapted to the harsh conditions of the mountain. These include species such as the snow leopard, the Himalayan tahr, and the musk deer, which are found at high elevations on the mountain. The mountain is also home to a number of bird species, including the golden eagle, the Himalayan griffon, and the lammergeier.

This is how a Himalayan tahr looks like

Climate and weather patterns on the mountain

The climate and weather patterns on Mount Everest are extreme, due to the mountain’s high elevation and location in the Himalayan mountain range. At the summit of the mountain, temperatures can drop to as low as -60°C (-76°F) in the winter and can rise to as high as 20°C (68°F) in the summer. These extreme temperatures, combined with the high altitude, can create dangerous conditions for climbers and tourists.

One of the most significant weather patterns on Mount Everest is the monsoon season, which occurs each year from June to September. During this time, the mountain is subjected to heavy rainfall and strong winds, which can make it difficult for climbers to reach the summit. The monsoon season is also characterized by an increase in humidity and a decrease in visibility, which can create additional challenges for those attempting to climb the mountain.

In addition to the monsoon season, Mount Everest is also subjected to strong winds and heavy snowfall throughout the year. The mountain is located in the jet stream, which means that it is subjected to high winds and storms that can make climbing conditions treacherous. These winds can also cause significant snowfall, which can create additional challenges for climbers and tourists.

Overall, the climate and weather patterns on Mount Everest are extreme and unpredictable, and they can have a significant impact on those who visit or attempt to climb the mountain. It is important for those planning to visit or climb the mountain to be prepared for these conditions and to take the necessary precautions to ensure their safety.

The cultural and spiritual significance of Mount Everest

For the local peoples of Nepal and Tibet, Mount Everest holds a special place in their cultural and spiritual traditions. It is revered as a symbol of strength and power, and it is often seen as a source of inspiration and spiritual enlightenment. Many people in the region believe that the mountain has a powerful energy that can be harnessed for positive change.

Mount Everest seen through Buddhist prayer flags (Tibet)

The cultural significance of Mount Everest is reflected in the many legends and stories that surround the mountain. For example, in Tibetan tradition, the mountain is said to be the home of the gods, and it is believed that the spirits of the dead travel to the mountain after they pass away. In Nepal, the mountain is also revered as a sacred site, and it is often visited by pilgrims who seek to gain spiritual enlightenment or to make offerings to the gods.

In summary

Mount Everest has captivated the imaginations of people around the world. From its discovery in the early 19th century to its modern-day status as a popular climbing and tourism destination, the mountain has played a central role in the history and culture of the region.

The mountain is revered as a sacred site by the local peoples of Nepal and Tibet, and it is seen as a symbol of strength and power. In addition to its cultural and spiritual significance, a mountain is also an important place of scientific study, as it is home to a wide variety of unique flora and fauna that provide insights into the natural world.

Despite its many attractions, Mount Everest is also a place that faces challenges and threats, including the impact of climbing expeditions and tourism on the mountain and its surroundings. If you consider trekking Everest or other parts of the Himalayas, you may want to be aware of how you can protect the environment while at it and of the challenges that come with climbing the world’s highest mountain peak.

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Other Topics

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This

Hey you,

Subscribe to Trekking Days and let's have fun. Find a travel destination, learn some new facts, and get products & discount alerts.

I suspect you will like us. *Wink*

You're in!

Index